• The Queen of Chambolle Musigny:  Ghislaine Barthod

    The Queen of Chambolle Musigny: Ghislaine Barthod

    Discussions have arose with some customers who love red Burgundy, but tend to prefer bottles on the younger side. While the tertiary notes that develop with age may speak to you, or not, it's undeniable some producers are known for the most glacial of aging. Ghislaine Barthod of Chambolle Musigny is at the top of that list.

    Today, I'm very happy to offer a range from Barthod covering 1989 through 2016. 


    I vividly remember Becky Wasserman's 10-Year-On retrospective of the 2002 vintage held at her home in Burgundy in 2012. Elite domaine's top Premier and Grand Cru bottlings filled tables for the walk-around tasting. When all was said and done, it was the wines of Ghislaine Barthod that held a level of freshness and verve that was in a world of its own at this tasting of vintage past.

    There's a piano string-like tension to these Chambolle-Musigny wines that, in many ways, illustrate the personality of the village the best. This high proportion of active limestone separates Chambolle from just about every village in the Côte d'Or, save for Volnay. Barthod's eye toward transparency and grace have always put these atop my personal Burgundy wish list.
    Posted by Alexander Rosen
  • 2016 Baby Bonnes Mares:   Sigaut Chambolle 1er Cru Les Sentiers

    2016 Baby Bonnes Mares: Sigaut Chambolle 1er Cru Les Sentiers

    Domaine Sigaut's Chambolle Musigny 1er Cru Les Fuées has been a huge hit with customers. With no Grand Cru holdings the domaine regularly flies under-the-radar, but proof in glass has made it apparent these are among the best values in my personal favorite appellation in the world. Sigaut's perfect counter-punch of precision and saturating power is one of my favorite Burgundy finds. However, through the domaine's oldest vines located below Grand Cru Bonnes Mares is where their lineup reaches its final crescendo.

    Today I'm happy to offer, from 1947-planted vines, Domaine Sigaut's Chambolle Musigny 1er Cru Les Sentiers Vieilles Vignes.


    During our 2016 Red Burgundy seminar and tasting it was Sigaut's Chambolle Musigny 1er Crus that stood out for the second year in a row. Simply put, this is where the convergence of terroir and value have no match. Sentiers sits directly below Chambolle Musigny's most powerful and structured Grand Cru, Bonnes Mares. As one drives along the Route des Grand Crus you will be taken directly through this point mid slope with Bonnes Mares to the west and Sentiers below to the east. Driving north, the price tag for this stretch of terroir begins at $300 and rises quickly to the tipping point over $1,000 per bottle.

    How has Sigaut flown under-the-radar? The 5-hectare estate has no Grand Cru holdings. In the minds of some collectors looking to pounce on Grand Crus Musigny and Bonnes Mares this leaves the domaine off the radar a bit. Of course, all of this is to our gain.

    Anne and Hervé Sigaut apply organic and biodynamic principles in the vines, and the wines show the purity of Chambolle with 100% de-stemmed fruit and aging in modest 30% new French oak. In 2016, that hauntingly ethereal and bona fide Chambolle Musigny lacing really makes itself known. This is a vintage that's very reminiscent of 2010, revealing that same rare proportion of ripe concentration with bright lift and energy.

    Pricing for 2016's have risen across the Cote d'Or, but Sigaut's top wines available today at $107 and $96 shows that value hunters who prefer traditional-leaning domaines have a reliable source for two of Chambolle Musigny's top Premier Cru climats.
    Posted by Alexander Rosen
  • 2012 Alto Piemonte Rewind:  Rovellotti Ghemme Chioso Dei Pomi

    2012 Alto Piemonte Rewind: Rovellotti Ghemme Chioso Dei Pomi

    2012 throughout Piedmont gave us open-knit wines with tremendous purity. While most wines have been released some time ago, and quantities long gone, those from Alto Piemonte's Rovellotti family in Ghemme were the last to arrive. Each year I'm all-in on this alpine Nebbiolo-based star, and 2012 has an upfront magic that cannot be missed.

    Today, I'm happy to offer the flagship wine from Rovellotti, the 2012 Ghemme Chiosi dei Pomi for $47 per bottle.

    Rovellotti was introduced to importer, Neal Rosenthal by the Ferrando family of Carema. When you taste Rovellotti it's clear these two estates are cut from the same cloth. Chiosi dei Pomi is a prime three hectare vineyard located in the center of Ghemme's 
    Baraggiola zone on red clay. Comprised of 85% Nebbiolo and 15% Vespolina, this traditional blend lets the latter variety provide some softness in this cooler, high altitude zone.

    I find a huge range of styles in Ghemme (and Alto Piemonte as a whole), with many examples showing grippy tannins that call to mind the tar rather than roses. What I love about the wines from Rovellotti (and Ferrando) is the softness of the fruit and elegance of the structure both still completely driven by its sense of place.

    Rovellotti's exclusive protocol of pumping over during fermentation and avoiding punchdowns of the cap plays a huge role in this more sensual and graceful texture. 
    Each vintage tasting Rovellotti it's their light-handed touch and supreme drinkability that stand out so much from the pack.

    Chiosi dei Pomi sees traditional vinification and aging in large Slavonian oak for 12 months, then racked into smaller (but still quite large!) five hectoliter barrels for 18 months. And then, of course, the wine is aged in bottle for an extended period of time at the estate prior to release.

    In the 2012 edition, notes of dried black cherries, cinnamon, and orange peel jump out of the glass. And the famous floral rose quality of Nebbiolo melds with an alpine mint inflection that lingers on the long finish.


    Introducing Rovellotti to customers who love Barolo and Barbaresco has given me a huge sense of gratification. In every circumstance there's a mix of joy and revelation, as the extended aging means this release is always so easy to drink from day one. Pricing for the Ghemme Chioso dei Pomi at $47 is always one of the great values in Piedmont, and in 2012 the mid-weight charm of this inviting Nebbiolo is crystal clear.
    Posted by Alexander Rosen
  • Barolo's Royal Family:  The Wines of Giuseppe Rinaldi

    Barolo's Royal Family: The Wines of Giuseppe Rinaldi

    An epic retrospective tasting of the wines from Giuseppe Rinaldi were featured by Antonio Galloni in Vinous in May of 2017. This dinner in London was complete with vintages spanning 1990-2010. Looking back at these notes recently was the impetus for today's offer. A visit just before harvest in 2012 to the cantina was one of my very fondest memories of travels on the wine route. It was a true privilege to meet the family and taste the wines, including the monumental 2010's still in botti.

    Today, I'm happy to offer a wide range from Giuseppe Rinaldi stretching back to the epic 1967 Brunate Riserva. 

    The first wines labeled under Giuseppe Rinaldi came in 1921 (pictured below). Battista Rinaldi continued the tradition at the estate in 1945, and after his passing his son Beppe returned home in 1992. Beppe's spirit over the last decades has been even more immortalized than the legendary wines he's produced. It was over this span that worldwide attention on Piedmont had gradually increased, and even in the last 15 years pricing and scarcity of the wines has drastically changed. In 2010 Beppe's daughter's Marta and Carlotta began making the wines, continuing in the same traditional fashion.

    Along with drinking the wines of Bartolo Mascarello and Giacomo Conterno, Rinaldis are among the most memorable I've had in Barolo. They appeal to every aspect of the senses and continually remind me that no matter how articulate experiences can be conveyed the true magic of them is a deeply personal one.

    As noted by Galloni, most of the production from this cantina had been sold to private customers. Finding back-vintage wines is not a common occurrence today. I was thrilled to be able to work over the last year with Rinaldi's US importer, Vinifera Imports, to acquire several older wines directly from the Rinaldi estate. 

    Rinaldi is a revered traditionalist, following the techniques Battista and Giuseppe had employed in the early and mid 1900's. Wines are macerated on their skins for a long time, and aging takes place large botti. The results are powerful, deep Barolos that are met with the precision and aromatics that make them incomparable. They offer wild spices, gamey notes, and of course Nebbiolo's tell-tale tar and roses.

    Essentially two Barolos were made, the Brunate-Le Coste and the Cannubi (San Lorenzo)-Ravera. Laws recently changed and now multiple crus aren't permitted on labels. Starting in 2010 the Brunate-Le Coste was bottled with a higher 85% Brunate and just 15% Le Coste (the maximum legal addition). The Cannubi (San Lorenzo)-Ravera began to implement wine from Le Coste and the new name for the bottling is "Tre Tine" (three vats).
    Posted by Alexander Rosen
  • The Pearl of Volnay:  Domaine Michel Lafarge

    The Pearl of Volnay: Domaine Michel Lafarge

    The highlight through eight days in Burgundy in July 2018 was undoubtedly visiting for the first time with Frédéric Lafarge in Volnay. The village is synonymous with grace and delicacy, but ardent collectors know in the traditional realm they can be among the most long-lived in Burgundy. The wines of Domaine Michel Lafarge are models for this tightrope act of finesse and tension, and they are among my favorites for this reason precisely.

    Today, I'm happy to offer a deep lineup from Domaine Michel Lafarge, highlighted by one of the regions's greatest value Pinot Noir, the Bourgogne Rouge from 2015 & 2014.

    The Bourgogne Rouge is sourced from one hectare of 41-52 yr-old vines in the lieu dit, 
    Petit Pré. Within the context of this most humble Burgundy appellation, Lafarge's example is the stuff I simply dream to drink on a nightly basis. It's highlighted by a purity and ethereal lift that's almost never realized at this level in Burgundy.

    Domaine Michel Lafarge was founded in the early 1800's, and today is managed by Michel, with his son Frédéric, and granddaughter Clothilde. The trio has seen dramatic trends sweep through Burgundy in their time. During the 1950's, vignerons started incorporating chemicals in the vineyard, but Lafarge never considered it. In the mid to late 80's when the practice of elevated extraction was rampant this domaine continued their own path founded on transparency. And then in 1995, Lafarge was one of the very first to begin biodynamic practices in the vineyard.

    Tradition can mean so many things in Burgundy, but the use of hand-destemming and reliance on nearly all older barrels for aging places the domaine in a very specific position.

    It may be unfair to jump in categorizing Volnay as feminine and ethereal, leading one to believe the wines lack the rigid structure required for serious aging. Michel Lafarge touched on this really eloquently in his terrific interview with Levi Dalton on I'll Drink to That! Wine Podcast:

    "It's difficult to achieve the silkiness in tannins, but in Volnay it's unacceptable to have hardness. It's the silkiness of the tannins that define the overriding definition of Volnay."

    Domaine Lafarge holds vineyards primarily in Volnay, with plots in Pommard, Beaune, and Meursault. All wines have a regal frame met with the translucent qualities that put terroir firmly in the crosshairs. Volnay may not have Grand Cru vineyards, but if given the opportunity to drink any Côte de Beaune reds, my first choice is always Volnay.

    Volnay Vendanges Sélectionnées comes from multiple parcels in the middle of Volnay adjacent to Premier Cru vineyards. 1.25 hectares of 50-yr-old vines. Aged in 7% new wood.

    Beaune 1er Cru Clos des Aigrots comes from a 0.88 hectare parcel of vines planted as far back as 1949. Soil here is limestone and clay, but with a mix of gravel and red clay.

    Beaune 1er Cru Grèves comes from a 0.38 hectare parcel of vines planted in 1951 on light gravel soils over limestone.

    Volnay 1er Cru Les Caillerets comes from a 0.28 hectare parcel planted in 1957 on red and brown clay soils over limestone. Aged in 15% new wood.

    Volnay 1er Cru Clos du Château des Ducs (Monopole) comes from a 0.57 hectare parcel planted as far back as 1946 on deep brown clay soils over limestone. This vineyard is owned exclusively by Lafarge and located next to their home garden. Aged in neutral oak.

    Volnay 1er Cru Clos des Chênes comes from a 0.9 hectare parcel planted as far back as 1951 on shallow red clay soils over limestone on the lower portion of the vineyard.
    Posted by Alexander Rosen