• Champagne Equilibrium

    Champagne Equilibrium

    Last holiday season, our staff had a smorgasbord tasting of champagnes from the Kogod cellar. I wasn’t able to attend, but Max was kind enough to hand-deliver some of the highlights to my doorstep, including David L'eclapart and Marguet. He also insisted that I needed to try Olivier Horiot, a micro-producer in the village of Les Riceys.

    5 Sens (or five senses) is our favorite in the lineup and has the most breadth, as it's a blend of Arbane, Pinot Blanc, Chardonnay, Pinot Meunier, and Pinot Noir. Les Riceys is a commune of three villages situated in the southernmost part of Champagne. The Kimmeridgian soil here is the same you'll find in Chablis and Sancerre, except these slopes primarily grow Pinot Noir. The village is also known for its Rosé des Riceys, a long-held tradition that’s now kept alive by a mere 15 to 20 producers.

    Olivier is the third generation to pursue viticulture. His father and grandfather sold all their fruit to the local cave coopérative until Olivier began winemaking in 1999. The Horiots farm seven hectares—all farmed biodynamically—but keep just two hectares for themselves. Olivier jokingly calls it the Champagne equilibrium. “This balance [allows us] to have more fun with the stuff we vinify independently,” he explained to Louis/Dressner, “to craft them more to our taste.”

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    Posted by Sydney Love
  • Garnacha Redefined

    Garnacha Redefined

    Comando G's Garnacha from the ancient hillsides above Madrid is among the most exciting Spanish reds I've encountered. Comando G has a unique understanding of Garnacha alongside a few others in the world, including Old Rayas and Henri Bonneau.

    These wines are similar to the composure, silken texture, and focus on freshness that I've come to expect from Cru Beaujolais, but we're not dealing with Gamay here. The Comando G wines are true to their Garnacha roots, with robust red fruit traits and wild incense spice, yet streamlined to reveal a brisk spine and chiseled rock minerality.

    Daniel Landi and Fernando Garcia became friends in college and, after graduation, worked for wineries around Madrid. Rumors spread about plots of old, wild vines growing high in the hills of Sierra de Gredos. The duo leased the vineyards, implemented organic and biodynamic farming, and began producing these micro-cuvées under their label.

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    Posted by Max Kogod
  • Savoie's Fresh Streak

    Savoie's Fresh Streak

    Over the last few years, I've found myself reaching more and more for new cool-climate French wines. Of course, that has to include the Savoie, located just along the Swiss border in view of Mont Blanc. Although history is as steep as the slopes here, it's a younger name, Domaine des Ardoisières, that I turn to for alpine inflections and mineral spring purity in both the whites and reds.

    Ardoisières works with two sites in the Savoie, Cevins and St. Pierre de Soucy, both farmed biodynamically since their 1998 founding. These vineyards were originally planted back in Roman times but were overtaken by forest as the region fell into obscurity. A group cleared these forests in the late 1990's for replanting, then in 2005, Champagne native Brice Omont took the lead on winemaking. This small-production estate has become the darling of the Savoie and a champion of the region's great potential.

    From the clay-dominant hillsides of St. Pierre de Soucy, Argile Blanc is made of 40% Jacquère, 40% Chardonnay, and 20% Mondeuse Blanche. And Argile Rouge is 80% Gamay and 20% Persan. Compared to Beaujolais Gamay, this Savoie rendition has lighter body and more pepper tones. The fruit profile is more red raspberry than the accustomed plush, grapey Beaujolais traits, and the finish lingers with a brisk mineral flicker that's lip-smacking good! Both wines are aged for nine months in vats.

    And from southeast-facing terraces in Cevins, Quartz Blanc is made of 100% Altesse and Améthyste Rouge is 60% Persan and 40% Mondeuse Noire. The heavy schist soils in Cevins give a racy personality and pulverized rock core that makes this one of my favorite French regions for crisp whites. If you haven't experienced Altesse, you're missing out! These being the most mineral-driven and age-worthy wines of the domaine, they're both aged 18 for months in barrel.

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    Posted by Max Kogod
  • Burgundy Love Affair: 2017 Joseph Drouhin

    Burgundy Love Affair: 2017 Joseph Drouhin

    If I were to choose one domaine in Burgundy to drink from Chablis through the Côte de Beaune, it would be Joseph Drouhin. The name has become synonymous with elegance and precision, offering terroir-driven wines founded upon transparency first and foremost. While the relatively large estate purchases grapes from many top growers, they also have their own domaine holdings where all aspects of viticulture are under their control—fully organic and biodynamic.

    Robert Drouhin was among the first in Burgundy to adopt "culture raisonnée" in the late 1950s, and today the domaine is fully organic and biodynamic in all owned vineyards. Grapes are de-stemmed and fermented with native yeasts. Gentle punch-downs are applied once per day for the first half of fermentation, with pump-overs utilized afterward.

    Drouhin's Beaune 1er Cru Monopole, Clos des Mouches Blanc and Rouge, transcends the reputation of its village. Located at the southern end of Beaune next to Pommard, Clos des Mouches always surprises with the classic Drouhin elegance married with the more powerful style of the village. The track record of aging is unmatched in Beaune.

    Chambolle Musigny 1er Cru is labeled as such, because it comes from only 1.3 hectares of vines divided through the Premier Cru vineyards: Noirots, Hauts Doix, Borniques, Plantes, and Combottes. The tiny parcels are vinified together. Among secret cuvées in all of France, I put this pretty high on my list. This always over-delivers with the classic, unadulterated lacey Chambolle purity and chalky definition.

    My first experience tasting the adored Premier Cru, Les Amoureuses, was at a small wine shop in Chassagne-Montrachet in 2012. A well-known Canadian collector called me over to taste the highly anticipated 2010 release. Not surprisingly, the wine in the glass was one of the most memorable I had in Burgundy. There's something to be said for the openness and generosity of brand new releases. Pure, unadulterated fruit and maximum impact.

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    Posted by Max Kogod
  • Bare-Naked Chablis

    Bare-Naked Chablis

    Finding Chablis deeply entrenched in the natural category while still delivering rigor and classicism is a challenge. For a while, hunting down ample quantities of Château de Béru, who's become a leader in the natural movement, was equally difficult, but thanks to New York importer Zev Rovine and his expansion out west, that's changed.

    The Béru family has owned and farmed Château de Béru for four centuries, their eight planted hectares being known as some of the stoniest vineyards in all of Chablis. Since 2004, it's been overseen by Comte Éric de Béru's daughter, Athénais, and she quickly converted their farming to organic and biodynamic practices. Old oak is employed for élevage, and wines are fermented with native yeasts. No filtering or fining.

    The wines really unfurl in the glass, opening up over an hour to reveal more luscious green apple, lime zest, toast, and almond paste, all held together with a brilliantly strict vein of minerality. For me, Chablis hits the highest notes when that broad wet stone mineral quality is met by a crystalline level of acidity.

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    Posted by Max Kogod