• 1988 - 2006  Mas de Daumas Gassac

    1988 - 2006 Mas de Daumas Gassac

    When given the choice to drink top Languedoc, young or old, the name Mas de Daumas Gassac comes to mind in a flash. The Cabernet Sauvignon-based wine is perhaps the only one outside of Bordeaux rivaling its top chateaux. The cool microclimate of this particular Herault vineyard has etched these wines into the history books for age-worthy Cabernet. I'm very happy to offer a wide range spanning 1988 - 2006, with the lowest price in the country for many.

    No estate exemplifies the pride and tradition of the Languedoc as much as Mas de Daumas Gassac. The domaine was established in 1970 when Véronique and Aimé Guibert came across an abandoned farmhouse owned by the Daumas family along the Gassac river in the Herault. The underground cold water springs and surrounding mountains created a relatively humid microclimate that mirrored Bordeaux's Médoc. This combination led to the planting of Cabernet Sauvignon on limestone-dominant soils. Vine material from First Growth Bordeaux chateaux were originally planted here with an eye toward creating the greatest Cabernet Sauvignon-dominant wine of southern France.

    France's southwest Languedoc has always been known for its warm Mediterranean climate, diversity of soil, and unmatched value. Vines were originally planted here in 125 B.C. by the Romans, and the ease at which the vines took to the land immediately made them a success throughout the empire. Today, the region has an abundance of 100-year-old+ plantings, with the dry and favorable climate allowing organic viticulture to strive.

    The typical blend here is 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, supplemented with portions of Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Tannat, and Malbec. Alcohol levels have remained modest through the ebb and flow of stylistic shifts, never taking cues from Bordeaux as things drastically changed in the 80's.

    The Gassac river and underground cold springs are as much as a part of terroir here as the limestone bedrock. The cooling influences are both are the critical elements for why Mas de Daumas Gassac has long stood out as a beacon of sorts for Languedoc freshness. The wines are highlighted by notes of espresso, dark chocolate, cigar box, brambly blackberries, with savory spices.

    The underlying verve and tension of the wines have allowed them to improve and transform dramatically with age. As always, the provenance of older wines is the critical factor in the quality you will find in glass, and I'm thrilled to offer this mint condition collection of Languedoc's star estate.

    1x 1988 Mas De Daumas Gassac Rouge Vin De Pays De L'Herault
    $399 per bottle.

    4x 1989 Mas De Daumas Gassac Rouge Vin De Pays De L'Herault
    $399 per bottle.

    1x 1990 Mas De Daumas Gassac Rouge Vin De Pays De L'Herault 
    $399 per bottle.

    11x 2000 Mas De Daumas Gassac Rouge Vin De Pays De L'Herault 
    $99 per bottle.

    12x 2002 Mas De Daumas Gassac Rouge Vin De Pays De L'Herault 
    $99 per bottle.

    12x 2003 Mas De Daumas Gassac Rouge Vin De Pays De L'Herault 
    $99 per bottle.

    12x 2004 Mas De Daumas Gassac Rouge Vin De Pays De L'Herault 
    $99 per bottle.

    15x 2005 Mas De Daumas Gassac Rouge Vin De Pays De L'Herault
    $103 per bottle.

    8x 2006 Mas De Daumas Gassac Rouge Vin De Pays De L'Herault 
    $95 per bottle.

    Posted by Max Kogod
  • The Best of Languedoc Reds!

    The Best of Languedoc Reds!

    France's southwest Languedoc has always been known for its warm Mediterranean climate, diversity of soil, and unmatched value. Vines were originally planted here in 125 BC by the Romans, and the ease at which the vines took to the land made them an immediate success throughout the empire. Today, the region has an abundance of 100-year-old + plantings of Grenache, Syrah, Carignan, and Mourèdre. The dry and favorable climate allows organic viticulture to strive. The trick is finding producers that hit that sweet spot between ripe, luscious fruit and fascinatingly mineral-tinged wines with a serious component of freshness. These are the benchmark producers of the region that deliver the goods. Don't let their modest prices lead you to believe these aren't incredibly serious and age-worthy wines. Each of these represent the best of their respective appellations, and all are found on top Michelin restaurants throughout the US and abroad. With fireplaces roaring these are the best choices to pair alongside your roasts tonight.

    Perhaps nobody exemplifies the pride and tradition of the Languedoc as much as Mas de Daumas Gassac. Located in the Hérault, the domaine was established in 1970 when Véronique and Aimé Guibert came across an abandoned farmhouse owned by the Daumas family along the Gasasc river. The underground cold water springs and surrounding mountains created a relatively humid microclimate that mirrored Bordeaux's Médoc. This combination led to the planting of Cabernet Sauvignon on limestone-dominant soils. Un-cloned cuttings from the top chateau of Bordeaux were planted here with the intention of giving top level quality rather than the more common priority in the region towards top level yields.

    The near-perfect 2010 vintage is a blend of 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 6.2% Cabernet Franc, 5.3% Merlot, 3.6% Pinot noir, 3.2% Tannat, 2% Malbec, and 9.7% "rare grape varieties". It comes in at a cool 13.4% alcohol thanks to its unique location within Hérault and influences by the Gassac river and underground cold springs. Full of dark, savory spices, espresso notes, dark chocolate, and brambly blackberries. 

    Perhaps nobody exemplifies the pride and tradition of the Languedoc as much as Mas de Daumas Gassac. Located in the Hérault, the domaine was established in 1970 when Véronique and Aimé Guibert came across an abandoned farmhouse owned by the Daumas family along the Gasasc river. The underground cold water springs and surrounding mountains created a relatively humid microclimate that mirrored Bordeaux's Médoc. This combination led to the planting of Cabernet Sauvignon on limestone-dominant soils. Un-cloned cuttings from the top chateau of Bordeaux were planted here with the intention of giving top level quality rather than the more common priority in the region towards top level yields.

    The near-perfect 2010 vintage is a blend of 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 6.2% Cabernet Franc, 5.3% Merlot, 3.6% Pinot noir, 3.2% Tannat, 2% Malbec, and 9.7% "rare grape varieties". It comes in at a cool 13.4% alcohol thanks to its unique location within Hérault and influences by the Gassac river and underground cold springs. Full of dark, savory spices, espresso notes, dark chocolate, and brambly blackberries. 

    2010 Mas de Daumas Gassac Hérault Rouge
    $49 per bottle.

    1988 Mas de Daumas Gassac Hérault Rouge
    $159 per bottle.

    1989 Mas de Daumas Gassac Hérault Rouge
    $169 per bottle.

    1990 Mas de Daumas Gassac Hérault Rouge
    $179 per bottle.

    Maxime Magnon was born a Burgundian, but without any family vineyard holdings. He worked alongside Jean Foillard of Morgon, where he learned the ultimate hands-off approach to natural viticulture and winemaking. He chose to settle in Corbières and purchased nine parcels over eleven hectares very high in the hills. He was certain that in order to craft intensely aromatic and wildly unique wines he would need to find that ideal spot with great elevation and very old vine plantings.

    Maxime employs organic and biodynamic farming, vinifies without sulphur, and uses a high portion of whole clusters in fermentation. He carefully sources Burgundian barrels from Chassagne-Montrachet. His wines are wild in a way that is rare for the Languedoc. They are very high toned and delicate, while still incredibly concentrated and intense. There's a liveliness on the palate that absolutely calls to mind those peerless wines of Jean Foillard.

    2014 Maxime Magnon Corbières Rozeta
    $34 per bottle.

    Rozeta comes from a combination of parcels on incredibly rocky limestone and schist soils with almost no topsoil. Mainly Carignan supplemented with Grenache Gris, Macabou, and Terret, which are all picked and fermented together.

    2015 Maxime Magnon Corbières Campagnès
    $47 per bottle.

    Campagnès comes from 100+ year-old Cariganan vines from a single vineyard of limestone and clay. This is the top wine of the estate and the most age-worthy.

    In 1985, upon receiving his degree in viticulture and oenology, Olivier Jullien returned home to find an underwhelming state of wine production in the Languedoc. Heavy crop loads and commercial farming had led to wines that had no signature of place or authenticity. He began revitalizing his family's vineyards, and purchasing choice parcels in the surrounding hillsides. No longer were his family's grapes sold to the local cooperative. Olivier, at just 20 years old, would vinify and age his family's wines with a sense of purpose in highlighting the best his appellation, Terrasses du Larzac, has to offer.

    At 3,000 foot elevation and 25 miles north of the Mediterranean, this personifies the more elegant and aromatic side of what the Langeudoc is all about. The soils are a total amalgamation between Olivier's parcels with limestone, clay, schist (decomposed granite), and gravel being dominant in each unique parcel.

    The blend of Carignan, Syrah, and Mourvèdre all work to provide complementary pieces. The Carignan for freshness. Syrah for inky color and body. Mourvèdre for its structure. Partial whole cluster fermentation is used to add spice and freshness, and large barrels are used for aging to preserve tension. Bright cherry, red plums, violets, and sweet brown spices all meld together with perfect harmony here.

    2010 Mas Jullien Terrasses du Larzac Rouge
    $48 per bottle

    Posted by Max Kogod