• Rheingau Redux:  J.B. Becker 1990 through 2015

    Rheingau Redux: J.B. Becker 1990 through 2015

    The Rheingau's unconventional and delicious wines of J.B. Becker are known well for his very late winery releases. Vintages offered below are 1990, 1996, and 2008. But, his 2015 collection of dry and dry-ish (halbtrocken) wines are equally as intriguing.

    Since 1971, Hajo Becker has been farming 11 hectares in the Rheingau. Certified organic since 2005, though Becker worked organically for decades. Native yeasts ferments and aging in massive 2,400-liter barrels. "Singular" is often the descriptor used for these mainly dry wines, and I cannot think of a better application of the word. These taste unlike any Riesling, or any wine you're likely to ever have. They are charming, supremely vibrant, and endlesssly thought-provoking.
    Posted by Alexander Rosen
  • Friday Firestorm: France, Italy, & Germany!

    Friday Firestorm: France, Italy, & Germany!

    Today's offering from France, Italy, and Germany was inspired by some very special new back-vintage arrivals. Some wines are not posted online yet, so please reply to this email with any order requests. 2002 Champagne is highlighted today with value plays like Lanson's two late releases, and Jacquesson's Dégorgement Tardif and Bollinger's R.D.

    Burgundy is lead with new arrivals of 1966 Mongeard-Mugneret Grands Echezeaux and 1969 Rousseau Clos de la Roche. Values here can be found with Moillard's 1983 Malconsorts and Daniel Rion's Beaux Monts. Germany features only two producers, Egon Müller and Klaus-Peter Keller. Rhône and Loire Valley are deep with Chave and Clos Rougeard. And finally, Italy features deep selections from the 60's and 70's, along with newer releases from Giacomo Conterno and brand new winery release of Emidio Pepe's 2010 Montepulciano d'Abruzzo.
    Posted by Alexander Rosen
  • Dry Riesling Wizardry:  Drops of Gold from Koehler-Ruprecht

    Dry Riesling Wizardry: Drops of Gold from Koehler-Ruprecht

    Magical is a word that adequately sums up the Koehler-Ruprecht estate in Germany's Pfalz region. The wines bear little resemblance to those of neighboring producers, nor to those next door in France's Alsace. Though Riesling is the focus here, a super-natural element exists within all of their wines that make them stand out among their contemporaries.

    These are some of the very most fascinating wines on earth, and it's the extreme hands-off approach here that's largely responsible for that singular quality. Today we take a look at the new release of the shimmering and crystalline 2016 vintage, as well as the beautifully balanced 2012 and the nervy and energetic 2008 vintage, each from the estate's top vineyards, Saumagen.


    The winemaking has remained about the same since the early 18th century when the domaine was established. Ferments occur completely naturally. Aging takes place in larger old German oak barrels. The vineyards are worked without herbicides, pesticides, or irrigation. The sweet spot of the holdings comes from Kallstadter's famed Saumagen vineyard, which translates to "pig's stomach" due to its shape. The Pfalz is home to an amalgamation of soils. But, here in Saumagen, it's limestone that takes center stage and bears the most responsibility for this site's crystalline nature, and peerless transformative abilities in bottle.

    Koehler-Ruprecht produces Rieslings dry, off-dry, and sweet, but it's their trocken (dry) bottlings that really hit the mark for me. With age these begin to convert into absolutely mystical wines. Their calling card is a cotton candy note that slowly develops. The protective influence of the Vosges mountains to the west gives the Pfalz the lowest amount of rainfall in Germany. This abundance of sunlight gives ample texture and full-throttle ripeness. Finding wines from the Pfalz that avoid getting a little chunky can be challenging. Koehler-Ruprecht's dry versions always carry a flashy mineral streak that brilliantly juxtaposes with the golden apple, sweet corn, ginger, and quintessential cotton candy note. 

    I was thrilled to receive this trio of Saumagen bottlings direct from the domaine. Each vintage offers a perfect illustration into how all these elements balance together, unfolding slowly over time. The wines are pure, textured, with a laser-cut focus to them - Riesling at its most enchanting.

    The different designations like Kabinett and Auslese refer to the ripeness level at picking. Auslese, picked later, will show more weight, and power. While Kabinett will show more delicate and agile. Both wines are fermented completely dry.
    Posted by Alexander Rosen