• The Queen of Chambolle Musigny:  Ghislaine Barthod

    The Queen of Chambolle Musigny: Ghislaine Barthod

    Discussions have arose with some customers who love red Burgundy, but tend to prefer bottles on the younger side. While the tertiary notes that develop with age may speak to you, or not, it's undeniable some producers are known for the most glacial of aging. Ghislaine Barthod of Chambolle Musigny is at the top of that list.

    Today, I'm very happy to offer a range from Barthod covering 1989 through 2016. 


    I vividly remember Becky Wasserman's 10-Year-On retrospective of the 2002 vintage held at her home in Burgundy in 2012. Elite domaine's top Premier and Grand Cru bottlings filled tables for the walk-around tasting. When all was said and done, it was the wines of Ghislaine Barthod that held a level of freshness and verve that was in a world of its own at this tasting of vintage past.

    There's a piano string-like tension to these Chambolle-Musigny wines that, in many ways, illustrate the personality of the village the best. This high proportion of active limestone separates Chambolle from just about every village in the Côte d'Or, save for Volnay. Barthod's eye toward transparency and grace have always put these atop my personal Burgundy wish list.
    Posted by Alexander Rosen
  • 2016 Hubert Lignier:  Côte de Nuits' Long-Distance Runner

    2016 Hubert Lignier: Côte de Nuits' Long-Distance Runner

    Huber Lignier is best known for his iconic Grand Cru, Clos de la Roche, as well as for his extended macerations and long barrel aging. Today, I'm happy to offer a range of Lignier from 2011 through 2016. The concentration and intensity of the 2016 vintage particularly suits the domaine's winemaking protocol and sets up this stable to again reflect the long-distance runner that has enamored collectors for forty years.

    Lignier has been imported by Neal Rosenthal (Barthod, Fourrier, Jacques Carillon) since the 1978 vintage, marking one of Neal's earliest and greatest successes. The style of the domaine has always been one that emphasized structure and a distinct terroir-driven soil expression. Located in Morey Saint Denis, Lignier's wines all display that gorgeous rusted earth, black cherry, and hoisin note that the village is often associated.

    2016 follows the dark-fruited and robust 2015 vintage. At first, 2016 appeared to be considerably brighter, but as the wines evolved in barrel they gained a darker profile and richness. They still show a more lifted style as compared to 2015, but in the end these are also going to be wines with very long aging potential. They are deeply complex, arguably a bit more site-specific in profile than the 2015's. They are terrific, but surely the Grand Crus will begin to enter their peak drinking window likely at age 15, and perhaps at age 10 for the Premier Crus.

    Each cuvée is unique from the next, and modest levels of new oak keep the focus squarely on site.  20-30% new wood for 
    Villages and Premiers, 50% for the Grand Crus. All grapes are destemmed, receive a 5-day cold soak, and then a relatively long fermentation of 15-20 days. The Villages wines are raised in barrel for 18 months, with Premier and Grand Crus receiving a 24-month elévage.

    Coming up short on finding back-vintages of Hubert Lignier has always been a thorn in my side. Rarely do collectors part with these aged gems, as the reward with years in bottle is too significant to part with. 
    Posted by Alexander Rosen
  • Puligny-Montrachet & Meursault For the Ages

    Puligny-Montrachet & Meursault For the Ages

    Puligny-Montrachet and Meursault, young and aged, today's list features top domaines that deliver pleasure tonight, as well as years of cellar transformation. Newer names on the block like Genot-Boulanger's Puligny 1er Folatières is a prime example of under-the-radar TOP wines of the village - sleek, mineral-driven, and supremely long finish, my favorite bottling of this domaine's brilliant range.

    Value hunters can see Joseph Colin and Jean-Marc Roulot's Bourgogne Blancs are in name only, as each sources exclusively from parcels in Puligny and Meursault, respectively.

    And, there's no shortage on top Grand Crus here from Ramonet, Leflaive, Roulot, and PYCM
    Posted by Alexander Rosen